Gastornis Egg Shell Fragment - Paleocene to Eocene Epoch - 56 to 45 MYA - Salernes, France
Gastornis Egg Shell Fragment - Paleocene to Eocene Epoch - 56 to 45 MYA - Salernes, France
Gastornis Egg Shell Fragment - Paleocene to Eocene Epoch - 56 to 45 MYA - Salernes, France
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Gastornis Egg Shell Fragment - Paleocene to Eocene Epoch - 56 to 45 MYA - Salernes, France
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Gastornis Egg Shell Fragment - Paleocene to Eocene Epoch - 56 to 45 MYA - Salernes, France
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Gastornis Egg Shell Fragment - Paleocene to Eocene Epoch - 56 to 45 MYA - Salernes, France

Gastornis Egg Shell Fragment

Paleocene to Eocene Epoch, 56 to 45 MYA

Origin: Salernes, France

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$23.00
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$23.00
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Price includes display box, the item you receive will be of similar quality to the one shown above!

These fossilized pieces of egg shell come from Gastornis, a large flightless bird that lived over 45 million years ago. The fragments were collected near the commune of Salernes in France—each is unique and appearances may vary!

Size: Approximately 0.5 inches across

What was Gastornis?

Image credit: Wikimedia.org

Gastorinus are an extinct genus of flightless birds that lived from the late Paleocene to the Eocene. These massive birds could grow up to 7 feet (2 meters) tall! Previously paleontologists believed species of Gastorins might have preyed upon small mammals, including the early horse Eohippus. However, recent studies looking further into their beaks and lack of hooked killing claws suggests these birds were actually herbivores that ate tough plant material and seeds.

There are five recognized species of Gastorins. The first of these species, Gastornis parisiensis, was described in 1844 after its fossil material was found in Central and Western Europe. Gastornis egg shells can be found in Spain and France.

Each purchase includes a glass top display box and an informational card about the fossil.